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Educational professionals are aware of the requirements under IDEA that each child in special education will have “a full and individual initial evaluation, in accordance with §§300.532 and 300.533, before the initial provision of special education and related services to a child with a disability under Part B of the Act.” 

IDEA notes:

(b) A variety of assessment tools and strategies are used to gather relevant functional and developmental information about the child, including information provided by the parent, and information related to enabling the child to be involved in and progress in the general curriculum (or for a preschool child, to participate in appropriate activities), that may assist in determining—

(1) Whether the child is a child with a disability under §300.7; and

(2) The content of the child’s IEP.

Additionally: 

(g) The child is assessed in all areas related to the suspected disability, including, if appropriate, health, vision, hearing, social and emotional status, general intelligence, academic performance, communicative status, and motor abilities.

(h) In evaluating each child with a disability under §§300.531-300.536, the evaluation is sufficiently comprehensive to identify all of the child's special education and related services needs, whether or not commonly linked to the disability category in which the child has been classified.

It is important that we be sure about how both vision and hearing function in children who we know are deaf or hard of hearing or who are visually impaired or blind, if we want them to be successful in their educational settings.  Children with multiple disabilities certainly need the best possible functioning of their vision and hearing to help them overcome their physical and/or cognitive challenges.  We need to always be asking ourselves as educational professionals, how is this child using his/her vision?  How is he/she using his/her hearing? 

Sometimes we think that a child may have problems with hearing and vision, but for some reason we are not sure.  Perhaps the child has other additional disabilities that make it hard to test for vision and hearing loss, or maybe the child has been getting by okay and is suddenly starting to fall behind.  Whenever we suspect there is something wrong with either of these senses, we MUST follow-up and try to learn more.  Not only because the law requires that we do, but as caring professionals, we want to make sure the child has as few obstacles as possible to learning.  If he or she needs some special accommodations, modifications or instructional strategies, we want to make sure he/she receives them.

This manual was developed to help guide an educational team, especially the Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and the Teacher of the Visually Impaired, through a process of checking on the student’s ability to use both of his distance senses so critical in classroom instruction.  These materials are intended as tools.  There is no requirement to use these forms or this process.  There may be other tools that work equally well or better than these.  Please feel free to copy these forms and use them as you like.  Let us know what was helpful and what needs changing. 

About the Development of This Document

This document was developed by a group of individuals over a period of two years between in 2000 and later field tested throughout Texas.  We would like to thank the individuals who gave their time to participate in this process:

Core Group

  • Robbie Blaha, Teacher Trainer, Texas DeafBlind Project
  • Leigh Crawshaw, Deaf Education Teacher/ Private Consultant
  • Tina Herzberg, Education Specialist, Education Service Center Region 12
  • Ann Johnson, Deaf Education Consultant for the Northeast Texas Cluster
  • Kate Moss, Teacher Trainer, Texas DeafBlind Project
  • Shelia Mosser, Teacher of the Visually Impaired, Killeen ISD

Other Contributors

  • Ann Adkins, Teacher Trainer, Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Visually Impaired Outreach
  • Gigi Brown, Early Childhood Specialist, Texas Deafblind Project
  • Janet Chlapek, Teacher of the Visually Impaired, Temple ISD
  • Ramona Egly, Deaf Education Teacher, Killeen ISD
  • hris Krasusky, Special Education Coordinator for AI/VI, Killeen ISD
  • Jenny Lace, Teacher Trainer, Texas Deafblind Project
  • Stacy Shafer, Early Childhood Specialist,
  • Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Visually Impaired Outreach
  • Heather Sullivan, Deaf Education Supervisor, Temple ISD
  • Amy Tange, COMS, Cypress-Fairbanks ISD
  • David Wiley, Transition Specialist, Texas Deafblind Project

 

Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing at Risk for Vision Loss

Students who are Blind or Visually Impaired at Risk for Hearing Loss

Hearing Quick Check

Vision Quick Check